Kids

Cognitive

Music training leads to greater gains in auditory and motor function when begun in young childhood; by adolescence, the plasticity that characterizes childhood has begun to decline.  Nevertheless, our results establish that music training impacts the auditory system even when it is begun in adolescence, suggesting that a modest amount of training begun later in life can affect neural function.

Cognitive

Music training not only helps children develop fine motor skills, but aids emotional and behavioral maturation as well, according to a new study, one of the largest to investigate the effects of playing an instrument on brain development.

Social

More benefits of music for children include learning cooperation, sharing, compromise, creativity, and concentration - skills that become invaluable as they enter school, face new challenges, and begin to form new friendships and develop social skills.

Social

Making music together, children learn to work as a team while they each contribute to the song in their own way. At the same time, music helps children learn that together they can make something larger than the sum of its parts.

Cognitive

Exposing children to music during early development helps them learn the sounds and meanings of words. Dancing to music helps children build motor skills while allowing them to practice self-expression. For children and adults, music helps strengthen memory skills.

Cognitive

 Researchers found that after two years, children who not only regularly attended music classes, but also actively participated in the class, showed larger improvements in how the brain processes speech and reading scores than their less-involved peers.

Social

Taking music lessons offers a space where kids learn how to accept and give constructive criticism, according to research published in The Wall Street Journal in 2014.

Social

 Parents who are highly involved in supporting their school’s music and other programs (including substantial numbers of parents who do not have high incomes) have higher expectations for music programs in their schools—and they’re significantly more likely to see these demands for quality met. 

Educational

Federal education policy specifically authorizes the use Title I funds for music and arts education. But few teachers— even the majority who know what Title I is—are aware of this significant opportunity to provide or improve music programs in the country. Even fewer parents are familiar with Title I, let alone the fact that Title I funds can be used for music education

Educational

Teachers in Title I schools are more likely to report that their schools have no music program at all. In Title I schools that do offer music programs, teacher responses suggest that they have fewer full-time music teachers— and teachers in these schools are more likely to report there are no professional development opportunities for the music teachers they do have. 

Pages