Kids

Educational

On average, both teachers and parents would be more willing to cut spending in 12 of  15 other programs before they’d cut funding for music and arts education. 

Educational

More than eight in 10 teachers (83 percent) and more than seven in 10 parents (73 percent) say budget cuts in music education are detrimental to students.

Social

Majorities of parents whose children are involved in music classes also credit music education for making them happier, more focused, more self-disciplined, stronger academically and more helpful.

Educational

 It’s striking that both teachers (87 percent) and parents (79 percent) strongly believe music education has a positive impact on overall academic performance.

Social

Four of the top five benefits teachers see in the potential of music education to help students express themselves (cited by 92 percent of teachers), become more confident (90 percent), and develop better practice habits (89 percent) and more self-discipline (88 percent). 

Educational

Students in the West are more likely to have school music programs that take place only outside of school hours—and they have access to fewer types of programs as well. 

Educational

African-American and Hispanic parents generally believe more strongly in a wide array of potential benefits from music education, are more likely to have seen these positive impacts on their own child and more strongly support expanding music education programs. Ironically, these parents also are more likely to report that there are no music programs in their schools (21 percent of African-American parents and 22 percent of Hispanic parents report this, compared to 15 percent of Caucasian parents). 

Educational

African-American parents (76 percent) and Hispanic parents (75 percent) are significantly more likely than Caucasian parents (67 percent) to enroll their children in school music classes where opportunities exist, and they are more interested in their children participating in virtually every type of music class in or out of school.

Educational

 Urban teachers also believe more strongly that music education can build 21st century skills, such as communication, critical thinking, problem-solving and innovation skills. 

Educational

Teachers in urban schools are more likely to consider music and arts education as core to the curriculum (38 percent) and value access to it (81 percent), compared to teachers in rural areas (30 percent of whom consider music and arts education as core to the curriculum and 70 percent of whom value access to it). 

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